Only Say Hi if You Mean It

ABA has been working on some sort of greeting program since R. started therapy over two years ago.  The ABA provider during EI tried different techniques.  They taught R. to do a high five and used that as a greeting for a while.  It did not transform into a natural wave as they were hoping, but it did help with imitation programs later and it is a social thing to do with someone.

Then they took photos of each therapist and enlarged them so they were a little larger than the size of an adult head.  They cut them out and laminated them and attached them to large popsicle sticks.   I guess the idea was that they would hold one up and she would wave at it.  It did not work, but she loved all the faces.  She would gather them all up and arrange them in a circle around  herself.   It was funny, all the therapists were uninhibited in their play and interactions with R., but those faces on sticks made them all uncomfortable.

By the time she started preschool she would say bye to the therapists, but only when they were at the door.  It was like they had to really mean it.  Our current ABA providers did not put any emphasis on a greeting program at first.  At our last team meeting with the teacher before summer started, everyone seemed to say that she would say hi or bye when someone said it to her.    The ABA supervisor said they would do an actual greetings program.  I told them about our previous experiences, and suggested they keep it natural.

At first they only ran the program when a second therapist or the supervisor or behaviorist was there.  The second person would go outside R.’s door, knock and enter and R. is supposed to say hi.  She did this fairly well, although after the second time she seemed to lose interest.

About a month ago they started doing the program with just one therapist, but not every day.   It seemed like it was going okay.  Sometimes R. would play along and say bye, see you later when they walked out, making into a game.   But in the last week they have been doing it every day.  I think they are trying to master it out.  And for some reason she will not say hi consistently.  I think it is because it does not feel natural.  Why should she say hi to someone who has been sitting with her for the past hour?

The supervisor went to observe the classroom this week.  R. walked up to her and said hi.